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World Cup 2022
 

World Cup 2022

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Ken Smith
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The big question though is why Motsi Mabuse appeared to wear a shopping basket on her head on Strictly last night?

This post was modified 1 week ago by Ken Smith

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Ken Smith
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Such an eerie silence on the football scene at the moment. Little interest shown by many in the World Cup, nor even the FA Cup 2nd Round next weekend showing up any tantalising fare either. The nearest to a local derby probably Sheffield Wednesday at home to Mansfield Town. Even Hartlepools at home to Harrogate on Saturday seemingly not showing much interest on Teesside either as the Pools league position is much more important this season. I guess that the Christmas fixture list will appear like preseason for most clubs in the Premier League and the Championship and might  throw up a few more surprising results.

After the excitement of the Rugby League and T20 World Cups, and the end of the golf season, I guess it’s back to listening to music for me or reliving football and golf memories from my extensive collection of past sports events on video cassettes and DVDs. Even Christmas has lost its appeal as I grow older, can’t wait for Boxing Day and the resumption of the football season.

This post was modified 1 week ago by Ken Smith

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Powmill-Naemore
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The Guardian reporting just now:

England and Wales back down on OneLove captain armbands after Fifa sanctions threat

England and Wales have backed down on wearing an armband supporting the LGBTQ+ community while playing in Qatar after the threat of sporting sanctions was raised by Fifa.

In a joint statement with Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland, the football associations of England and Wales said:

Fifa has been very clear that it will impose sporting sanctions if our captians wear the armbands on the field of play. As national federations, we can’t put our players in a position where they could face sporting sanctions including bookings, so we have asked the captains not to attept to wear the armbands in Fifa World Cup games.

We were prepared to pay fines … however we cannot put out players in the situation where they might be booked or even forced to leave the field of play.

The statement goes on to say “We are very frustrated by the Fifa decision which we believe in unpredented” and that “Our players and coaches are disappointed – they are strong supporters of inclusion and will show support in other ways.”

The national associations had written to Fifa about their intention to wear the armbands in September, but heard nothing back. The armbands were worn with little fanfare or reaction from Fifa in September’s Nations League fixtures.

That is very disappointing news, if not wholly unsurprising.

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Ken Smith
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It’s not too late to withdraw from the World Cup yet. If all the European countries agreed to withdraw after the first round of fixtures, that certainly would send out a powerful message to FIFA that football will not be dictated to by an association unworthy of governing football. Of course it won’t happen as self interest will come to the fore, but perhaps sabotage is the only option now available to show how corrupt FIFA has become.


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PaulInBoro
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Posted by: @ken

It’s not too late to withdraw from the World Cup yet. If all the European countries agreed to withdraw after the first round of fixtures, that certainly would send out a powerful message to FIFA that football will not be dictated to by an association unworthy of governing football. Of course it won’t happen as self interest will come to the fore, but perhaps sabotage is the only option now available to show how corrupt FIFA has become.

Unfortunately @ken football and morals are not comfortable bedfellows, money is intoxicating


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Forever Dormo
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Thanks for those links, Werder and Martin. And now the whole parade begins....  The most expensive "party" in history?


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werdermouth
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@powmillnaemore 

Not at all surprising as we all know FIFA only has one love... $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


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werdermouth
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@ken 

I suspect withdrawal from the tournament is never going to happen given many England and other supporters have probably paid a fortune to follow their team in Qatar.

Maybe Harry Kane should just wear a simple black armband and perhaps England should just boot the ball into the stand from the kick-off as protest - preferably in the direction of any FIFA official attending!


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Powmill-Naemore
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Did I just see the USA number 8 against Wales play with  a  🌈  coloured in his hair? If that was the rainbow colours I noticed, then all power to him, and where was FIFA and their threat of yellow cards for such a thing?


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Original Fat Bob
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@powmillnaemore 

🎶da da dada da dada🎶


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Ken Smith
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On reflection it’s probably overstating it to say that the four Home countries all  qualified for the 1958 World Cup as there wasn’t a true qualification process in progress. FIFA in their wisdom had already decided that all 4 Home Countries should be represented in Sweden. As I stated earlier I was completing my National Service in Singapore where there was no television available so all I can say is that it was a fait accompli and report on the results of the matches played in the Home Championship that year:-

The first match took place on 5th October 1957 between Northern Ireland and Scotland in Belfast and ended 1-1 with Billy Bingham scoring for the Irish and Graham Leggat for the Scots. 

Two weeks later England beat Wales in Cardiff 4-0 with Johnny Haynes scoring twice, Tom Finney once and an unspecified own goal completing the scoring.  

It wasn’t until 6th November that the third match took place at Wembley where Northern Ireland stunned England 3-2 with Jimmy McIlroy, Billy Simpson and Sammy McCrory scoring for the Irish, and Alan A’Acourt and Duncan Edwards for England. It was only Ireland’s second win in England and their first at Wembley, the only other time being 43 years previously 1-0 in 1914 at Ayresome Park  would you believe? 

The fourth match took place a week later at Hampden Park and ended 1-1 against Wales with Bobby Collins scoring for the Scots and Terry Medwin for the Welsh.

The last two matches didn’t take place until April as the Irish missed their chance of winning the Home Championship by being held to a 1-1 draw in Cardiff with Billy Simpson again scoring for the Irish and Ron Hewitt for the Welsh. 

England then took the Championship by emphatically beating Scotland 4-0 at Hampden Park with goals from Bobby Charlton and Bryan Douglas, whilst Derek Kevan sealed his place in the England squad over Brian Clough by scoring twice.

Then onto Sweden as I previously reported and both Scotland and England (after a playoff with Russia) being eliminated after the group stages, whilst Northern Ireland and Wales both progressed to the Quarterfinals.

France were probably the surprise team having previously taken a 0-4 hammering from England in a friendly match at Wembley in the previous November. Certainly Just Fontaine was top goal scorer with 13 goals during the competition. England were perhaps unlucky to lose to Brazil having had two goals disallowed, and Wales certainly missed their talisman John Charles through injury against the Brazilians. However the Irish suffered most through injuries yet were still the only British team to win a match. Also Derek Kevan was England’s top goal scorer albeit with only 2 goals, the same number as Ivor Allchurch did for Wales. No Scot scored more than once, but pride of place went to Aston Villa’s Irish striker Peter McParland who scored every one of his country’s 4 goals.

The next World Cup was played in Chile in 1962 and more about that later?

This post was modified 1 week ago by Ken Smith
This post was modified 1 week ago by werdermouth

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werdermouth
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@ken 

To avoid a duplicate post I copied your text from your second one with the added sentence over your first.

Incidentally, I used a useful online tool (see link below) that compares two texts and highlights the difference to make sure I wasn't missing anything.

https://text-compare.com/


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werdermouth
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Good to finally to see football making the headlines at the World Cup with an impressive display by England's young players yesterday - plus some inconsistent refereeing over holding in the penalty area with one given by VAR and another not. Also good battling second-half performance by Wales to get a draw against the USA. Although, perhaps the biggest surprise is the amount of time added on that is being given - an unprecedented 25 minutes in the England game and also well over 10 minutes at the end of the Wales game. 


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werdermouth
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@powmillnaemore 

I believe as OFB's tune indicated it was in fact the red, white and blue of the US of A


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Martin Bellamy
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Posted by: @werdermouth

@powmillnaemore 

I believe as OFB's tune indicated it was in fact the red, white and blue of the US of A

USA, USA, USA! (ad infinitum). I expected to hear, “get in the hole!”


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Powmill-Naemore
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@martin-bellamy 

🤣


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Ken Smith
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 Well I’ve managed to avoid any of this year’s World Cup so far and didn’t know if any goals had indeed been scored, although I had suspected there might have been a couple. I’ve not watched any of the football yet, and don’t intend to anyway. I’m treating this World Cup as if it shouldn’t have happened, and treated it like I would have treated the 1939/40 season if I’d been able to remember it  -  null and void, and eradicated from my records.  

Apparently it was the season that never was, as all 44 matches didn’t appear in the records because of the outbreak of World War Two. All clubs had played 3 matches each and were replayed exactly seven years later to the day, which was certainly good news for the Boro as they would have started the season with only one point when in fact they won all three 7 years later starting with successive 1-0 away wins against Aston Villa and champions elect Liverpool, before beating Stoke City 5-4 at home in the third match.

Of course it didn’t last as we all thought that it couldn’t, as  from being second on Boxing Day after beating Leeds United 3-0 away, Boro ended the season in 10 position after taking only one more point from their final seven matches.


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Ken Smith
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Now before anybody thinks that I’m completely bonkers, I hope that this proves that whilst admittedly agreeing that I may be eccentric, I’m certainly not bonkers.

You see, I’ve always maintained that black and white have the same meaning, and the Oxford Dictionary supports me. According to the editors of this publication, black also means dark. Dark can also mean dim. Dim can also mean pale, and pale can also mean white. 

Ergo, black = white.

Therefore next time anyone accuses me of arguing that black is white, I have the proof to back me up. But some folk maintain that neither black nor white are really colours anyway, merely shades. But surely that can’t be right, so as Neil Warnock used to say “Are you with me?”.

This post was modified 7 days ago by Ken Smith

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Powmill-Naemore
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Posted by: @ken

Now before anybody thinks that I’m completely bonkers, I hope that this proves that whilst admittedly agreeing that I may be eccentric, I’m certainly not bonkers.

You see, I’ve always maintained that black and white have the same meaning, and the Oxford Dictionary supports me. According to the editors of this publication, black also means dark. Dark can also mean dim. Dim can also mean pale, and pale can also mean white. 

Ergo, black = white.

Therefore next time anyone accuses me of arguing that black is white, I have the proof to back me up. But some folk maintain that neither black nor white are really colours anyway, merely shades. But surely that can’t be right, so as Neil Warnock used to say “Are you with me?”.

That reminds me, Ken, of the time when I was a little boy and we were visiting my aunt and uncle one Sunday afternoon in Manchester. We have a new colour telly, said my uncle as he offered for us to sit and watch "The Big Match". When it came on I complained, but that is only black and white. No said Uncle Frank, it is three colours, black, white and grey...


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Martin Bellamy
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Posted by: @ken

Now before anybody thinks that I’m completely bonkers, I hope that this proves that whilst admittedly agreeing that I may be eccentric, I’m certainly not bonkers.

You see, I’ve always maintained that black and white have the same meaning, and the Oxford Dictionary supports me. According to the editors of this publication, black also means dark. Dark can also mean dim. Dim can also mean pale, and pale can also mean white. 

Ergo, black = white.

Therefore next time anyone accuses me of arguing that black is white, I have the proof to back me up. But some folk maintain that neither black nor white are really colours anyway, merely shades. But surely that can’t be right, so as Neil Warnock used to say “Are you with me?”.

Dim can also mean pale? I can’t get my head around that, I’m afraid.


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Ken Smith
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Posted by: @martin-bellamy
Posted by: @ken

Now before anybody thinks that I’m completely bonkers, I hope that this proves that whilst admittedly agreeing that I may be eccentric, I’m certainly not bonkers.

You see, I’ve always maintained that black and white have the same meaning, and the Oxford Dictionary supports me. According to the editors of this publication, black also means dark. Dark can also mean dim. Dim can also mean pale, and pale can also mean white. 

Ergo, black = white.

Therefore next time anyone accuses me of arguing that black is white, I have the proof to back me up. But some folk maintain that neither black nor white are really colours anyway, merely shades. But surely that can’t be right, so as Neil Warnock used to say “Are you with me?”.

Dim can also mean pale? I can’t get my head around that, I’m afraid.

My Oxford Dictionary of 1,632 pages definitely states that one meaning of pale is lacking lustre, dim.


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Ken Smith
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Serendipitously whilst taking a break from watching Sports DVDs and Video Cassettes I came across Julian Webber introducing a programme about Classic FM’s rising stars on the Sky Arts Channel. One particularly took my attention,  her name being Chelsea Guo from New York. Not only being a fine contralto singer, she also is a fine classical pianist. 

Now I realise that women find it easier to multi-task than men, but this young lady can sing classical music simultaneously whilst has just sung Franz Schubert’s ‘An Die Musik’ whiist playing it on the piano.with no music either.

 Now I realise that Elton John wrote ‘Candle in the Wind’ originally about Marilyn Monroe, and that Chas and Dave sang duets whilst playing the piano, not forgetting Jimmy ‘snozzle’ Durante, and the trad jazz Kenny Ball, the not actually at the same time, but I’ve never heard of a classical pianist singing an aria at the same time as playing it on the piano, although not actually at the same time. Also the classical pianist Glenn Gould had an annoying habit of humming whilst playing the piano. 

What next? A violinist singing at the same time as playing as Andre Rieu sometimes does.

This post was modified 6 days ago by Ken Smith

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Ken Smith
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I have to agree with Michael Carrick when he states that looking at League tables is futile at this stage of the season. Since 2004 there have been 58 clubs that have participated in the Championship, 37 of whom have finished in the top 6 after the end of the season, 36 who have been relegated, and a staggering 19 who have finished in the top 6 as well as being relegated.

Cardiff City and Derby County have spent the most time in the Championship with 17 seasons each, with Queen’s Park Rangers and Reading on 16 each. Boro have spent 13 there although not consequently, and just to refresh your memories the following 8 relegated clubs have spent a couple of years in the Championship since 2004:-    Burton Albion (2016/18), Colchester United (2017/18), Gillingham (2004/05), MK Dons (2015/16), Portsmouth (2011/12), Southend United (2006/07), Wycombe (2020/21) and Yeovil Town (2013/14).  

This season alone at least 15 clubs have at some stage been in the top 6. A couple of wins and Boro MIGHT be in the top half, but conversely a couple of defeats and Boro COULD be fighting relegation. Let’s just accumulate as many points as we can in the final 25 matches and see where that takes us. You know it makes sense!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This post was modified 5 days ago by Ken Smith

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Philip of Huddersfield
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Many of mine and other Boro supporters describing Boro’s performance earlier in the season could almost repeat it here to describe England’s performance tonight.

Played too slow, far too much passing the ball sideways and backwards particularly between the back four, lack of a spark, didn’t close the opposition down quickly enough, players too content to just keep possession , poor midfield etc etc.  -  the single word to describe the performance was boring.  Maguire was probably England’s man of the match!!
USA were the better team.

If England play like this later in the competition ( assuming they get out of the Group) then other teams will not see them as a threat.

Looking forward to those teams with a number of ‘ flair’ players who provide a bit of excitement.

Philip of Huddersfield 

 


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Ken Smith
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The 1962 World Cup was the most controversial at the time for a number of reasons. After the previous two World Cups had been held in Europe, the American stipulated that unless the next World Cup was held in South America, the member countries would boycott the tournament. Unfortunately only two countries were in contention, Chile and Argentina although the former had been devastated by the the largest earthquake in history in Valdivia in 1960 when much of the country was devastated.

Nevertheless Chile had been chosen ahead of Argentina after assurances from the Chilean delegation that work had been well in hand for two years. The trouble was though that apart from Santiago which had a capacity of over 60,000 none of the other stadia accommodated any way near 20,000 whereas Argentina had several large stadia. When a couple of reporters from Italy’s major sports newspapers including La Gazzetta della Sport arrived in Chile and obviously hadn’t heard of Dale Mackenzie or his famous book “How to win friends and influence people” reported that Chile was a country of prostitutes and drug addicts, and that it was “madness” to award a country so devastated by an earthquake to host such a prestigious tournament.

Both countries were drawn in Group Two alongside Switzerland and West Germany and although the Chile v Switzerland match ended with a 3-1 win for the hosts without too much incident two goals from Leonel Sanchez and one from Jaime Ramirez gave the hosts the 2 points. A day later the match between the Swiss and the Germans ended in a goalless draw next match. However the next match became known as ‘The Battle of Santiago’. Obviously inflamed by the comments of the two protagonists the both sets of players were incensed right from the start. The first foul occurred after only 12 seconds of play as Giorgio Ferrini was sent off for a cynical foul on Honorino Landa, but referee to leave the field of play. It took almost an 8 minute of stoppage before the English referee had to summon the police to frogmarch Ferrinio off the pitch. Later on Sanchez knocked out Mario David breaking the Italian’s nose right in front of the referee yet escaping any other punishment. Aston had certainly lost the plot and seemed reluctant to incense the home crowd for fear of recriminations. Altogether there were 3 other occasions where the local police had to intervene to prevent a riot. 

David Coleman described the match as “The most stupid, appalling, disgusting and disgraceful exhibition of football probably in the history of the game”. Few could argue with Coleman’s sentiments, and that became the precursor of the introduction of red and yellow cards throughout the World0. I the aftermath West Germany won Group Two after beating Switzerland  beawhilst Italy were eliminated despite beating Switzerland 3-0 in their final group match. 

Meanwhile in Group Four after losing 1-2 to Hungary in their opening match, Alan Peacock made his debut as  England redeemed themselves with a 3-1 win over Argentina before a paltry crowd of 5,700 in Rancagua with a penalty from Ron Flowers, and further goals from Bobby Charlton and Jimmy Greaves settling  the issue. England’s final group match against Bulgaria ended goalless but confirmed progression to the quarterfinals on goal average at the expense of Argentina.

In Group One Uruguay started with a  2-1 win against newcomers Colombia after being a goal behind at the interval, whilst the Soviet Union accounted for Yugoslavia 2-0 a day later, but when the Soviets having established a 3-0 lead in the first 12 minutes conceded 3 late goals to Colombia in an entertaining 4-4 draw, and then with Yugoslavia beating Uruguay 3-1, Group One was undecided going into the final matches. However Yugoslavia then thrashed Colombia 5-0 and a last minute goal from Valentin Ivanov securing a 2-1 win for the Soviet Union over Uruguay, another of the pre-favourites had hit the dust.

There was no disputing Brazil’s march to the quarterfinals in Group Three though as the Samba kings beat both Mexico 2-0 and Spain 2-1 as they and Czechoslovakia qualified for the quarterfinals. Unfortunately for England though that meant an encounter with Brazil for a place in the semifinals. So how did the match pan out? Well as far as I can recall England’s life was snuffed out by a Brazilian side bereft of the injured Pele, but who needs Pele when the ‘little bird’ was in full song and at his bewildering best. To be fair though Gerry Francis did equalise within 5 minutes as he was on hand to sweep the ball home after a Jimmy Greaves header had hit the bar. After the interval though Springett playing instead of the injured Gordon Banks couldn’t hold on to a free kick from Vada as Garrincha sent a viciously swerving shot outside the reach of the England goalkeeper and into the roof of the net. Although England played with pride and passion they were simply outclassed by a very talented team.

The other quarterfinals produced wins for Chile 2-1 over the Soviet Union, and single goal wins for Yugoslavia over West Germany, and Czechoslovakia over Hungary respectively. The bronze medal winners were the Czechs who beat Yugoslavia 3-1 whilst, Brazil beat Czechoslovakia 3-1 in Santiago to keep the Jules Rimet trophy as the first country to win it three times.

The next World Cup was to be in England for the first time and the North East was to take a prominent part in that regard four years later.

This post was modified 4 days ago by Ken Smith

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Ken Smith
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Well I’m actually enjoying NOT watching the 2022 World Cup, and the sooner it is over the better as far as I’m concerned. My recollections of my next World Cup in England in 1966 will no doubt be more satisfactory than the current one. However, remind me how many boring goalless draws have there been so far? Could it be something to do with heat exhaustion?.

 

 

This post was modified 4 days ago by Ken Smith

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Original Fat Bob
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@kensmith

Ken

The World Cup section is still alive !

OFB


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Ken Smith
Mr
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@original-fat-bob 

Then why is it that I can’t recover a blog which I did yesterday having always being able to in the past even the following day despite not actually pressing the  ‘add reply’ button. Is there now a time limit on ‘add reply’,because there hasn’t been before. Also I always check that I’m logged in, but occasionally through a long blog a notice appears that their is a problem in posting, and I suddenly discover that some of the blog has disappeared because somewhere during the blog that mysteriously all of a sudden I discover that I’m not actually logged in anymore, so is there also a time limit there too.

You, Andy and Werder like me must realise that researching the facts often takes up more time than compiling the blog, and all three of you must be congratulated for the fine work you do. However I have handbooks covering the last 64 years and it takes time to refresh my memory as I’m no Leslie Welch the original memory man. 

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Original Fat Bob
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Posted by: @ken

The 1962 World Cup was the most controversial at the time for a number of reasons. After the previous two World Cups had been held in Europe, the American stipulated that unless the next World Cup was held in South America, the member countries would boycott the tournament. Unfortunately only two countries were in contention, Chile and Argentina although the former had been devastated by the the largest earthquake in history in Valdivia in 1960 when much of the country was devastated.

Nevertheless Chile had been chosen ahead of Argentina after assurances from the Chilean delegation that work had been well in hand for two years. The trouble was though that apart from Santiago which had a capacity of over 60,000 none of the other stadia accommodated any way near 20,000 whereas Argentina had several large stadia. When a couple of reporters from Italy’s major sports newspapers including La Gazzetta della Sport arrived in Chile and obviously hadn’t heard of Dale Mackenzie or his famous book “How to win friends and influence people” reported that Chile was a country of prostitutes and drug addicts, and that it was “madness” to award a country so devastated by an earthquake to host such a prestigious tournament.

Both countries were drawn in Group Two alongside Switzerland and West Germany and although the Chile v Switzerland match ended with a 3-1 win for the hosts without too much incident two goals from Leonel Sanchez and one from Jaime Ramirez gave the hosts the 2 points. A day later the match between the Swiss and the Germans ended in a goalless draw next match. However the next match became known as ‘The Battle of Santiago’. Obviously inflamed by the comments of the two protagonists the both sets of players were incensed right from the start. The first foul occurred after only 12 seconds of play as Giorgio Ferrini was sent off for a cynical foul on Honorino Landa, but referee to leave the field of play. It took almost an 8 minute of stoppage before the English referee had to summon the police to frogmarch Ferrinio off the pitch. Later on Sanchez knocked out Mario David breaking the Italian’s nose right in front of the referee yet escaping any other punishment. Aston had certainly lost the plot and seemed reluctant to incense the home crowd for fear of recriminations. Altogether there were 3 other occasions where the local police had to intervene to prevent a riot. 

David Coleman described the match as “The most stupid, appalling, disgusting and disgraceful exhibition of football probably in the history of the game”. Few could argue with Coleman’s sentiments, and that became the precursor of the introduction of red and yellow cards throughout the World0. I the aftermath West Germany won Group Two after beating Switzerland  beawhilst Italy were eliminated despite beating Switzerland 3-0 in their final group match. 

Meanwhile in Group Four after losing 1-2 to Hungary in their opening match, Alan Peacock made his debut as  England redeemed themselves with a 3-1 win over Argentina before a paltry crowd of 5,700 in Rancagua with a penalty from Ron Flowers, and further goals from Bobby Charlton and Jimmy Greaves settling  the issue. England’s final group match against Bulgaria ended goalless but confirmed progression to the quarterfinals on goal average at the expense of Argentina.

In Group One Uruguay started with a  2-1 win against newcomers Colombia after being a goal behind at the interval, whilst the Soviet Union accounted for Yugoslavia 2-0 a day later, but when the Soviets having established a 3-0 lead in the first 12 minutes conceded 3 late goals to Colombia in an entertaining 4-4 draw, and then with Yugoslavia beating Uruguay 3-1, Group One was undecided going into the final matches. However Yugoslavia then thrashed Colombia 5-0 and a last minute goal from Valentin Ivanov securing a 2-1 win for the Soviet Union over Uruguay, another of the pre-favourites had hit the dust.

There was no disputing Brazil’s march to the quarterfinals in Group Three though as the Samba kings beat both Mexico 2-0 and Spain 2-1 as they and Czechoslovakia qualified for the quarterfinals. Unfortunately for England though that meant an encounter with Brazil for a place in the semifinals. So how did the match pan out? Well as far as I can recall England’s life was snuffed out by a Brazilian side bereft of the injured Pele, but who needs Pele when the ‘little bird’ was in full song and at his bewildering best. To be fair though Gerry Francis did equalise within 5 minutes as he was on hand to sweep the ball home after a Jimmy Greaves header had hit the bar. After the interval though Springett playing instead of the injured Gordon Banks couldn’t hold on to a free kick from Vada as Garrincha sent a viciously swerving shot outside the reach of the England goalkeeper and into the roof of the net. Although England played with pride and passion they were simply outclassed by a very talented team.

The other quarterfinals produced wins for Chile 2-1 over the Soviet Union, and single goal wins for Yugoslavia over West Germany, and Czechoslovakia over Hungary respectively. The bronze medal winners were the Czechs who beat Yugoslavia 3-1 whilst, Brazil beat Czechoslovakia 3-1 in Santiago to keep the Jules Rimet trophy as the first country to win it three times.

The next World Cup was to be in England for the first time and the North East was to take a prominent part in that regard four years later.

Was it this one Ken?


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Original Fat Bob
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Topic starter  

@ken 

When I’m researching a post I always make notes and use a different file to the Blog electronically. When satisfied with the content I then copy the document and post it on the blog so that the script is unsullied and not in any danger of being lost.

If there is any problem with the post I still have the original document as back up. Hope this makes sense to you but it saves having to rewrite and lost material.

Perhaps Werder can help to recover any post for you as I’m unsure how the data is formatted and encapsulated.

OFB


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