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Ken Smith Points Of...
 

Ken Smith Points Of View

 

Original Fat Bob
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Hi Ken

ive opened this post especially for you as there are so many interesting things and points of view for you to get across to us all.

You can add to it and the other Diasborians can respond so that you can see everything in one place.

Keep posting your comments are appreciated and make this blog what it is.

OFB


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Ken Smith
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Thanks OFB. Much appreciated.


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Ken Smith
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Hartlepool United have an FA Cup replay tomorrow night against Division 1 opponents Wycombe, the winners to play away to Lincoln City. It seems a big ask for Pools who have only one away win this season. Also Pools have been drawn away in the FA Trophy to Sheffield Wednesday, the first meeting between the two clubs since the Division 1 Playoff Final at the Millennium Stadium in 2005 when Pools were only 8 minutes away from a place in the Championship.


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Redcar Red
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@Andy R 

No need to apologise. But having lived through the Second World War when churches were fuller than perhaps they are today that people needed some reassurance and turned to God for that. Also when one gets nearer to death some of us hope that they will be reunited with their loved ones. I know it sounds illogical, but I still live in hope that there is a form of everlasting life in paradise, though well aware that nobody deceased has confirmed that paradise or heaven exists, not Jehovah’s Witnesses nor even my late wife but I still talk to her every day as if she’s still beside me although I admit it’s a one way conversation.

 

Ken

For what it's worth I have had two experiences in life which fill me with great hope of something after we leave this life and go wherever it is we go to. The first one I witnessed left me absolutely speechless (a genuine "you had to be there moment") and the second one, was, I suppose what some may call a "visitation" for want of a better explanation, and this is from someone who is quite cynical and distrustful at the best of times.

I don't subscribe to blind faith and I don't believe in religion, I've seen too many painful things and have too many experiences of so called righteous people worshipping then quite happily shooting, bombing and maiming others who ironically worship the same God albeit at a different place of worship. I do however believe that something way beyond our intelligence and understanding is responsible for our universe, world and our life. That in itself probably aligns very strongly with those who believe in God. Where we would agree is that I don't believe that he/she/it/them would want us to kill or injure in their name as human kind have done and sadly continue to do down the centuries. 

I vehemently despise differentiation on any grounds, be it creed, colour, sex, ethnicity, football club or any other label that people seemingly want to divide us with. None of us are any better than anyone else, highlighting differences just builds resentment on both sides, divide and conquer only ends one way. 

For me religion was created by mankind to invoke fear and thereby control and with it building wealth and power at the expense of those they claim to be "looking after". The only "Church" I respect is the Salvation Army who go out and actually do what I think would be appreciated by whatever all powerful, all seeing entity, energy or force there probably or possibly is out there. I hope it is and I hope that reward in some way comes their way. Perhaps the feeling those kind deeds give them of contentment and kindness is the reward itself?

Anyway my original point is that despite my personal dismissal of religions my belief of something that may have been before and something that may lie ahead is strong and unshakeable. As Boro fans I suppose we all must at some level have a sprinkling of faith or at least hope of some kind.

For what it's worth I believe your late wife hears every word you say, but deep down I think you know that already. 

 


Ken Smith
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@Redcar Red  

It’s when one gets nearer to death one questions the logic of it all. When my wife died I heard her last breath, saw her lying in her coffin, watched the coffin slide behind the curtain to be cremated, have her ashes in a sealed urn on a table, and when the sun shines through the window can actually see the level of the ashes but have never accepted that she’s dead but just moved to another room. Talking to her is my way of coping. I watch ‘Songs of Praise’ and especially those from the Caribbean sing joyously about how wonderful it will be when they meet Jesus in paradise, and I find myself joining in the singing with them. They’re all a happy bunch, but look forward to dying. Well I can understand that if they’re in pain, and sometimes I almost look forward to death yet not in a melancholy way.  I find television a bore because I regularly fall asleep watching it, I’ve become housebound because I’m afraid of falling outside. I’m becoming afraid of driving if the sun’s too low in the sky. I’ve had a good life but sometimes think that enough is enough, and I’m ready to meet my maker, but how are all these dead people accommodated in heaven? What if I don’t like it there? There’s no turning back, so I reckon I may as well hang around talking to my wife on this side of the divide even if she doesn’t tell me how life is like up there. 


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Ken Smith
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A humorous aside was on my wedding day when making my vows when I said the words “according to God’s holy war” instead of  ‘God’s holy law” and had to correct it. Wedding day nerves? It had been chaos at my parents house in the morning with whose turn it was for a bath, that I absconded from the chaos and rode my bike to my house a mile away to cut the lawn. Then later I heard all the plans that my wife’s relatives planned to congregate on Redcar Central Station to wave us off to Harrogate for our week’s honeymoon. My wife and I didn’t want all that fuss so my best man arranged for the taxi to drive us to Redcar East Halt Station further back up the line and as the train approached Redcar Central we hid in the toilet.

Then when we reached our boarding house in Harrogate and were shown our room, it contained twin beds. We both laughed about it, but after 3 days we curtailed our honeymoon as we couldn’t wait to get into our new home and didn’t tell our parents until later. We got into a lot of trouble for that ruse, but we didn’t care as we were just happy to be alone together in our own home. Who needs a honeymoon to start their married life? Different values of married bliss, but it was 60 years ago.

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by Ken Smith

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Allan in Bahrain
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That makes me larff, I spent my honeymoon in a small caravan up on the cliff at Filey - bloody awful September weather all week!

There was no Ibiza, BVI or Dubai in those days.

 


Liked by 4 people: Ken Smith, jarkko, Original Fat Bob and Redcar Red
 
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Ken Smith
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@Allan in Bahrain  

What’s more it was two years before we bought a black and white TV set with a 12 inch screen and only one channel the BBC in those days which opened at 2pm and closed at 11pm with the playing of the National Anthem. However we were lucky as my wife’s parents gave us what was know as a radiogram, so we listened to Radio Luxembourg, played our small collection of vinyl records, played cards, and went to the cinema once a week. My wife worked in Tyler’s gents outfitters 6 days a week for about £6, I worked in the Treasurer’s Department along with Paul Daniels for £380 pound a year, whilst the  Borough Treasurer’s annual salary was £1,202-10 shillings, and I remember saying to my wife that I’d be well satisfied if I ever earned a £1,000 a year. However my mortgage for a 3 bedroom house was only £12-10 shillings per month and it cost only 3 shillings to watch the Boro. But happy days as we had a week’s holiday in either Scarborough or Blackpool most years.

Where have those 60 years gone?

 

 

 

 


jarkko
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@ken So you were married the year I was born?

Yes, where have those years gone, I wonder, too. The price of housing is very deep nowadays. But still we have too much material. Strange as I do not think we are not more happy.

Except when Boro won the Lsague Cup at Cardiff. Up the Boro! 


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Ken Smith
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England’s 10-0 win last night was too easy but not their biggest ever. Apparently they have twice beaten Northern Ireland by scoring 13 goals, 13-0 in Belfast on the 18th February 1882, and on the same date seven years later 13-2 in Sunderland. But during my lifetime on an end of season tour I remember England winning 10-0 in Lisbon against Portugal in May 1947 with hat tricks from the great Tommy Lawton and Stanley Mortensen. The Preston maestro Tom Finney scored one, and even Stanley Matthews scored a rare goal. Apparently England also beat the USA 10-0 in New York in 1964 but that one passed me by. But just for the record Roger Hunt scored 4, Fred Pickering 3, Terry Paine 2 and Bobby Charlton 1.


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Forever Dormo
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I smiled to read Ken's posts about his wedding/honeymoon and the black+white TV and working at the Treasurer's Dept. In my own time I must have caught many hundreds if not thousands of trains both at Redcar Central and the East Halt.

There were also some years when I caught the bus in good old Dormo, to go to work in Middlesbrough.  One Boxing Day when there was snow about, when I was still unmarried and living with my parents, I stood at the bus stop for ages.  But no bus came (it was a Bank Holiday!) and, of course, the office was shut anyway. No idea why I thought it would be open! It must have been the previous day's Christmas Spirit. I guess I must have phoned the office from our fairly recently-intalled phone at home, to confirm the office was, in fact, closed.


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Original Fat Bob
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I actually started work in an office on New Years Day.

Every firm had the bank holiday except this company who were London based and didn’t realise that we had a holiday on New Years Day!

So there was a senior, myself and another new starter and that was it! Everyone else took the day off!

The first and last New Year’s Day I ever worked !

OFB


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Martin Bellamy
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@original-fat-bob

I don’t think New Years Day became an official Bank Holiday until the early 70s. 


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